Call Girl Of Cthulhu

call-girl-of-cthulhuBy the title alone one should have a strong grasp on what kind of film this is. Not so much a direct adaptation of any one of H.P. Lovecrafts works, but more an homage to the writer. Call Girl of Cthulhu is actually an entertaining and imaginative. More than worth the hour and half it takes to watch. Though I would say this is a film for everyone. But if the idea of blending the works of H.P. Lovecraft and the a film style that I would normally attribute to Troma, then this film is most certainly something you should consider watching.

Carter Wilcox (David Phillip Carollo) a… late 20’s virgin? Who is also a talented artist. He also cries when he masturbates and lives with a smoking hot musician Erica Zann (Nicolette le Faye), who has inordinately loud sex with her boyfriend Rick ‘The Dick’ Pickman (Alex Mendez). He see’s Call Girl Riley Whatley (Melissa O’Brien) arrive at his apartment complex for a date with one of her Jon’s, Walter Delapore (George Stover). Infatuated Carter gets her card and hires her… so that he can paint her. While this has been going on Call Girls and working girls have fallen victim to a cult of Cthulhu worshipers lead by Sebastian Suydum (Dave Gamble). Suydum is searching for the prophesied bride of Cthulhu, who will bear his child and awaken the great old ones and is to be known by the distinctive mark on her ass. Opposing them is Professor Edna Curwen (Helenmary Ball) and her friend and ally Squid (Sabrina Taylor-Smith). The Professor steals the book containing the spells needed to open the gateway between the worlds as well as locate Cthulhu’s bride from the cult. She then hires Carter to replicate all the images from the stolen book, to a fake she’s made with false spells and bad information. Her plan being to switch the books having the cults never be the wiser. A good plan that eventually falls apart. While picking up the forged book from Carter, Squid notices the portrait he’s painted of Rita, who is now dating and notices her birthmark. The Professor notices it for what it is, but they are too late as the Suydum has already found her. The Professor is captured by Suydum, he discovers the books and Squid escapes. Rita becomes the bride of Cthulhu as the prophecy foretold. Suydum lets her go, pregnant with Cthulhu’s child Rita begins to change and starts visiting all of her Jon’s. Infecting them and leaving them grotesque monsters, if not out right killing them. Squid rallies the aid of Carter and his roommate Erica to thwart the Cults plans and save the world.

This movie was a little rocky for me to get into. But after about twenty minutes I was more than hooked. Call Girl Of Cthulhu is one of those strange films that I love because it’s so strange and so much its own thing. The only thing I can compare this film would be a Troma film. This isn’t an insult against Midnight Crew Studios, it’s very much a compliment. Coupled with the fact that this film is just a continuance stream of hidden references to one of the greatest horror authors of all time, it’s no surprise that this film delighted me.

In fact, my only real complaint is that at times the film feels like it’s trying really hard. Which can be a little bothersome for me. But I’m not going to waste anyone’s time by harping about a film knowing what it is and trying it’s hardest to be the best version of that it can.

The effects are actually right where I like them. Cheap and primary practical. The gore ranges widely from O.K. to straight gruesome. I don’t know what it is about watching a face melt that makes think “Yea, this is entertainment”. But unlike some films where the gore actually starts to bother me, here it’s so smoothly blended into the aesthetics of the film that it’s never jarring.

Final thoughts, it’s worth seeing. I’m not sure I can recommend this film enough. I’m not saying Call Girl Of Cthulhu is a perfect film, because honestly it’s not. But it’s not trying to be. It just wants to be fun and that it managed in spades. 8.5/10

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